Large, imposing brick building in front of which stand bare trees

180 Years Old

We’re not planning a party this year, but the National Library of Medicine turns 180 years old in 2016. From our beginning in 1836 as a few leather-bound books in the library of the US Army Surgeon General’s office, we became the world’s largest biomedical library. We’re so large that as of today, our most…

Casual headshots of four men and two women

A Quick Q&A with NCBI Biocurators

In this new, occasional feature we call Quick Q&A, NLM staff share a bit about why they’re motivated and inspired. We also asked them to add something surprising about themselves. For our first Quick Q&A, we reached six scientists in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) who work in the Conserved Domain Database (CDD)…

A man with a toothache points out the tooth to a dentist.

A to Z with Medical History

From an Arabic manuscript from the year 1094 to social media about Zika, NLM’s History of Medicine Division (HMD) works to ensure that historical and current treasures are available to anyone who’s curious. The NIH Catalyst recently explored the nature of that work, with two stories about HMD’s efforts to preserve and share those treasures–and…

The first two paragraphs of Public Law 84-941

What’s in a Name?

It was 60 years ago today that the National Library of Medicine got its current name. And yes, it took an act of Congress. On August 3, 1956, the National Library of Medicine Act, an amendment to Title III of the Public Health Service Act, placed the Armed Forces Medical Library under the Public Health…